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Grounds for Agreement The Political Economy of the Coffee Commodity Chain

By tracing how this division of the coffee dollar has changed over time, Grounds for Agreement demonstrates that the politically regulated world market that prevailed from the s through the s was more fair for coffee growers than is the current, globalized market controlled by the corporations. Talbot explains why fair trade and organic coffees, by themselves, are not adequate to ensure fairness for all coffee growers and he argues that a return to a politically regulated market is the best way to solve the current crisis among coffee growers and producers.

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John Talbot () | UC Berkeley Sociology Department

Verified Purchase. Good book. In this rigorous analysis of the global trade in coffee, Talbot identifies structural forces limiting the effectiveness and scope of social justice movements on the market such as organic and fair trade certification programs. It furthers the University's objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide.

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Book: Grounds for Agreement: The Political Economy of the Coffee Commodity Chain

Google Scholar. Cite Citation. Permissions Icon Permissions. As a result, there are plenty of small, independent farms that are not Fairtrade certified even though they meet or exceed the Fairtrade standards. Originally, coffee farming was done in the shade of trees, which provided natural habitat for many animals and insects, roughly approximating the biodiversity of a natural forest.


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They also typically cultivated bananas and fruit trees as shade for the coffee trees, [28] which provided additional income and food security. However, in the s and s, during the Green Revolution , the US Agency for International Development and other groups gave eighty million dollars to plantations in Latin America for advancements to go along with the general shift to technified agriculture. Sun cultivation involves cutting down trees, and high inputs of chemical fertilizers and pesticides.

Environmental problems, such as deforestation , pesticide pollution , habitat destruction , soil and water degradation , are the effects of most modern coffee farms, and the biodiversity on the coffee farm and in the surrounding areas suffer. As a result, there has been a return to both traditional and new methods of growing shade-tolerant varieties.

Shade-grown coffee can often earn a premium as a more environmentally sustainable alternative to mainstream sun-grown coffee. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The examples and perspective in this section may not represent a worldwide view of the subject.

You may improve this section , discuss the issue on the talk page , or create a new article , as appropriate. January Learn how and when to remove this template message.

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This article relies extensively on quotations that were previously collated by an advocacy or lobbying group. Please improve this article or discuss the issue on the talk page. December Main article: Fair trade coffee. Business and economics portal Coffee portal. World Development. FAO Statistics Division. Archived from the original PDF on 25 June Retrieved 13 September Archived from the original on 14 October Retrieved 24 October Under "subject", select "Export value of primary commodity.

Select the desired year and click "show data.


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So many people who have written about coffee have gotten it wrong. Coffee is not the second most valuable primary commodity in world trade, as is often stated.

Grounds for agreement: the political economy of the coffee commodity chain

Coffee is the second most valuable commodity exported by developing countries. Archived from the original on 10 July Retrieved 27 May New York: Basic Books. Food and Bioprocess Technology. United States Department of Agriculture. Archived from the original PDF on 5 March Retrieved 26 March London: International Coffee Organization.