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The Catcher in the Rye J. A Game of Thrones George R. With that name in tow I managed to learn my work as an actor well by being in more than stage productions throughout the country, and although most of them were touring companies and Summer Stocks, they helped me to gain the stature as an actor that I needed. As luck would have it, and luck is paramount in Show Business if one is to be successful, two members from the Swedish Film Industry were in Hollywood looking for an American actor to play the villain in a Swedish cowboy film.

I returned to the United States thinking I would retire gracefully only to realize that I was at odds with myself; that retirement was not for me. Several years later, feeling I had enough experience in life to write a book or two, I began my career as an Author and Playwright. See All Customer Reviews. Shop Books. Read an excerpt of this book! Add to Wishlist. USD 1. Sign in to Purchase Instantly.

Explore Now. Buy As Gift. Overview It was obvious that the game Pickle Ball had becomes an anathema to the captain…for when he was through listening to the irate caller on the telephone, Captain Carl Sanders, the commander of the police force in Mesa, Arizona, banged the phone down angrily in its cradle and then with the furrows in his brow deepening he fixed his eyes sharply on Jeff Conradi and Tom Eager, the detectives he had summoned to his office earlier that morning and said, "I wish those asinine Pickle Ball players would grow up.

Product Details About the Author. About the Author Who is Harry Harris? Show More. Average Review. Write a Review. Related Searches. Definitely should appeal to those interested in Soviet history as the whole ordeal was a byproduct of this broken system, as well as to anyone interested in the real story behind this plot line from Child Truth is definitely stranger than fiction in this case.

I received an advance copy of the new ebook edition courtesy of the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for review. Oct 05, Ronnie Cramer rated it it was amazing.

This is a well-researched and detailed account of Russian serial killer Andrei Romanovich Chikatilo and his twelve year reign of terror. It also includes a fair amount of Soviet history and some very astute observations of the communist system at work the author is a British journalist who was stationed in Moscow. Dec 28, Kelly rated it it was amazing Shelves: library-book , true-crime. Excellently written.

Details are thorough without being horribly gruesome.

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The background information is thorough enough to explain why Chikatilo did what he did. Jan 29, Paul Brown rated it liked it. If you're into true crime books the grisly story of Andrei Chikatilo has it all: a prolific serial killer delving into depravity and cruelty to rival the likes of Jeffrey Dahmer and Ted Bundy, a police investigation filled with a decade of blunders and a eventful trial that could have been cooked up in Hollywood.

The Red Ripper is a bit of a two for one deal; not only is the reader guided through Chikatilo's life and crimes there's also a fascinating insight into the modern history of Russia fro If you're into true crime books the grisly story of Andrei Chikatilo has it all: a prolific serial killer delving into depravity and cruelty to rival the likes of Jeffrey Dahmer and Ted Bundy, a police investigation filled with a decade of blunders and a eventful trial that could have been cooked up in Hollywood.

The Red Ripper is a bit of a two for one deal; not only is the reader guided through Chikatilo's life and crimes there's also a fascinating insight into the modern history of Russia from the tyrannical rule of Stalin up to the break up of the Soviet Union. There's a lot of material condensed into this slim volume of pages and there's obviously been a lot of research put into putting this book together.

It is a vast and intriguing story and don't take my word for it this was the inspiration for the novel Child 44 and the film adaptation as well as the 90's TVM Citizen X. While the source material has the potential to be a brilliant book unfortunately The Red Ripper isn't that book.

Conradi is a journalist and it shows in his writing as he just rattles through the facts and doesn't breathe any life into the story and by relegating victims to name and numbers rather than fleshing them out with brief bios his writing comes across as cold and clinical. He ultimately fails to engage the reader with his writing style and consequently this slim books seems a lot longer than it actually is. The foreward by Colin Wilson also promises an in depth psychological profile of the killer and while Conradi tries to explain what made the monster a lot of his conclusions are the blatantly obvious that anyone with a passing interest in criminal psychology could probably cobble together themselves.

It's a good read as much for the Soviet history as the crimes themselves but I think entrusted to a far more talented writer and penned a few years down the line with the benefit of a sense of perspective rather than rushing a book out to tie in with the sensational trial in this could have been brilliant. Sadly it wasn't to be. Jul 19, Terry Cornell rated it it was ok Shelves: true-crime.

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First true crime book that I've read that takes place in Russia. I give the book two stars instead of three because I think it should have been better written. The author was a foreign correspondent for 'The Sunday Times' of London, so I expected the writing to be more polished. I did find the book well researched, and the book is also an observation of the changing political system and society with the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The trial portion is also interesting in addressing the diff First true crime book that I've read that takes place in Russia.

February 10, 2011

The trial portion is also interesting in addressing the differences in U. A fairly quick read, despite some very long Russian names! May 10, Brian rated it liked it. I don't know why, but when the syllables and emphasis are right my brain turns things like book titles and names into popular songs.

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Sometimes first lines are singularly appropriate. The way I pronounce his last name fits perfectly with Abba's "Chiquitita": "Chikatilo, tell me what's wrong. I take the subject matter very seriously, but a little levity never hurts. This dude killed more than 50 people, most of them children, both male and female. He liked to say that he led them into the woods for sex and that the killing wasn't planned, but in fact he couldn't perform with the willing ones and evidently didn't even try with the others.

What got him off in all cases was murder and mutilation, often cruelly prolonged with knife thrusts calculated to keep the victims alive for as long as possible. Meanwhile, he maintained a largely sexless marriage, managing to father two children, more out of a sense of duty than as a result of any normal passion. His reign of terror lasted 12 years.

How could he operate for so long and accumulate so many victims? Part of it was luck, or what passes for it in the criminal community. Unimaginable luck in his case. He was arrested once and his blood typed. From semen samples, the police knew they were looking for someone with type AB blood.

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Chikatilo's blood came back as type A. What the Russian authorities didn't know at the time was that in very rare cases, semen and blood types don't match. So they let him go.


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And he went on to claim an additional 21 victims. Another factor was police inefficiency and the Soviet system of law enforcement generally, which put a premium on catching someone -- anyone, really. Several men, most of them intellectually impaired to one degree or another, found themselves in jail for crimes Chikatilo committed, and one was even executed. The author tells a very sad story about the mother of the executed man when authorities went to her to apologize for their mistake.

And then there was Chikatilo's own penchant for staying a step ahead of the police, using his various jobs over the years to travel and kill in areas not yet fully staked out by the police or abandoned because they thought he'd moved on. It was just this sort of rational calculation that destroyed any hope he ever had of an insanity defense. Conradi does a good job of taking us through Chikatilo's life even if he doesn't cite his sources and the changing times in his country.

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His murders took place, after all, during the last years of the Soviet Union and ended as the new era was just beginning. I kept expecting a change in emphasis -- from crimes to trial, for instance -- but Chikatilo was so sickeningly prolific that the murders just kept coming.

Then, too, as Conradi shows, Russian trials weren't what they are in the West. Though they acknowledged a prosecutor and a defense attorney, it was, as Conradi says, really a "one-man show" -- that one man being the judge. And because Chikatilo confessed, the verdict was a foregone conclusion. Very little time is spent on the trial. Indeed, this book seems to have gone to press before the verdict was announced. The Red Ripper lacks a certain depth of detail I think there's a reason Conradi doesn't cite his sources , but it's a good, well-written book that exposes more than the depravity of its subject; it also reminds us how terrifyingly vulnerable we all are to people, like Chikatilo, who appear outwardly harmless, but whose true "otherness" is a state of mind.

Feb 25, Meghan rated it it was ok. Can that just be my review? At least the murders weren't described so as to give titillating cheap thrills. At least each victim was named, and, if possible, a teeny bit written about them. So why do I feel so squicky inside for having read this book? I read that whole section of that was just a list of murdered women without comment. But this -- this I just feel dirty inside after reading it.

I received a copy free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.